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Some Whose Riches Were Not Made In The Mines

ANDERSON, CHAS. J.
  There are few men in the Klondike more widely known or more justly popular than Charles J. Anderson, the subject of this sketch.  Charlie, as he is familiarly known, first went to the lower river camps - Fortymile and Circle - in 1893, and was there continuously until 1897, when he removed to the Klondike and purchased No. 29 Eldorado, a claim which has become world-famous for the richness of its gravel.  He also purchased a three-eights interest in 32 Eldorado which, like the other, is very rich ground.  At No. 29 he works a crew of 26 men in two shifts, and utilizes the water of the creek by raising it 23 feet with a steam pump, by which it is again and again passed through the sluice-boxes.  By this ingenious device he is always provided with a "sluice-head."

If it were not that he is famous for many other good traits, Charlie's popularity would still be boundless by reason of the generous manner in which he treats his men.  Notwithstanding the highest wages paid elsewhere are $1 per hour, while many men pay as low as 60 cents, Charlie has paid his employees $1.50 per hour, and will probably continue to do so while he has a shovel or a pick raised.  This generosity is fully appreciated by his men, who work as well while he is absent as they do while he is there.  He is very successful in his mining operations, and always washes from the top dirt down to bedrock.  His open, genial, honest ways have made Charlie a favorite, even where he is not personally known, and that he may live long to enjoy his riches in the wish of all.

Mr. Anderson went to the outside in the fall of 1898, which was the first time since he came here in 1893.  While abroad he purchased a handsome country residence not far from San Francisco, where his Klondike friends will one day see him living in ease and happiness. 

Source: The Klondike Nugget, November 1, 1899.

   
BARTLETT BROTHERS
  The firm of Bartlett Brothers, packers and freighters, is as well known throughout the Yukon territory as the names of Eldorado and Bonanza.  Everyone who came over the White Pass during the rush of '97-'98 will remember the long pack trains of the Bartlett Brothers which then did the work now being done by the White Pass & Yukon Railway.  Their train consisted of 100 animals and with these, hundreds of tons of merchandise were packed over the White Pass to Lake Bennett for trans-shipment to Dawson.

When the rush of that busy period was over the Messrs. Bartlett came on into the metropolis of the Yukon, bringing with them the big pack train which had netted them a comfortable stake on the White Pass.

At the present time they are working 88 animals between Dawson and different points on the creeks, including Grand Forks, Gold Bottom and Dominion.  On the latter creek they own large stables for the accommodation of their pack trains.

The efforts of this energetic firm, however, have not ceased with the handling of goods for other parties.  On both Dominion ad Gold Bottom creeks they have opened up large stores, which they have stocked with as fine and varied assortment of goods as can be purchased anywhere in Dawson.  They also operate the largest hotels upon the two creeks named, and cater to the wants of the public in a manner that is winning them a constantly increasing army of patrons.

The different houses operated by the firm are stocked with the finest brands of wines, liquors and cigars obtainable, and every effort is made to insure the comfort of those who patronize them.  The main office of the Bartlett Bros. is on First avenue, in Dawson, with a branch establishment on Fifth avenue, near the bridge.

Both the brothers, Michael and Edward, are young men who have only their own industry and untiring attention to business to thank for the success which has attended their efforts in the Klondike.  In addition to their freighting business they are largely interested in mining property, notably on a bench opposite No. 5 below upper discovery on Dominion and a hillside opposite 24 below.

During the present winter they will operate a daily stage between Dawson, Gold Bottom and Dominion.  The site of their hotel and store on the latter creek commands a striking view upon all sides.  They have recently added a meat market to their other business and are now furnishing their customers with all classes of fresh meats, which the market affords.

Cariboo hotel, which is the name of the Dominion creek house, is a pretentious two-story structure.  The dimensions are 25x40 feet.

The Bartlett boys have been operating in the Klondike a little more than a year and a half, and in that short time have won a marked and deserved success.

Klondike Nugget, November 1, 1899.

   
BERRY, CLARENCE J.
  Clarence J. Berry is among those fortunate ones who came up from the lower country during the original Klondike stampede.  Mr. Berry is a native of California, in which state he was reared and educated.  His experience in the Yukon is by no means his first introduction into mining, as he had engaged in the same pursuit for some years before leaving California.

Mr. Berry was at Fortymile when news of the strike on Bonanza creek reached that camp.  Leaving there with others who were bent upon getting in on the ground floor, he succeeded in securing No. 6 on Eldorado creek, of which claim he is the sole owner.  Clarence was among the first to demonstrate the wealth lying beneath the surface on Eldorado, the fame of which creek has since gone around the entire world.  He was also among the originators of the idea that mechanical means could be successfully applied to the development of ground in the Klondike.  Mr. Berry owns altogether 838 feet of the richest ground on Eldorado, including besides his original claim - No. 6, a half interest in No. 5, and five fractions.  Among his other holdings are No. 3 below and one half of No. 40 above on Bonanza, two-thirds of No. 21 below on Hunker, and one-half of No. 42 on the same creek, and one-half of No. 18 below upper on Dominion.

He makes his headquarters upon his Eldorado claim - No. 6, to the development of which property he gives his personal attention.  Forty men are employed on the claim who are divided into two shifts of 20 each, working a period of 10 hours.

Realizing, as noted above, the advantage that would accrue from applying mechanical methods in overcoming the peculiar difficulties that are met with in the development of Yukon placer grounds, Mr. Berry has placed a large steam plant upon his Eldorado ground.

A boiler of 30-horsepower and a 15-horsepower engine are now being used to raise the surplus water from the creek to a height of 25 feet for sluicing purposes.  A centrifugal pump furnishes the force by which the water is raised.  It requires a total of 1000 feet of boxes to carry the water back to the point where it joins the main run.

A most interesting feature on No. 6 is the system of derricks and hoists employed in lifting the pay dirt.  A series of buckets, working on the endless chain principle, carry the rich pay dirt to the sluice boxes.  The buckets are large, averaging in capacity 35 pans.  During a shift of 10 hours, the number of buckets of pay dirt taken out runs in the neighborhood of 750.

The waste is thrown back on the lower end of the claim from which the pay has already been taken.

A plant for generating electricity has recently been placed on the claim.  The plant furnishes three arc lights and 30 16-candle incandescent lamps, a portion of which are used in Mr. Berry's residence, the balance being employed in lighting the claim during the working of the night shift.

Mr. Berry is a scientific as well as practical miner, having devoted a great deal of time and effort in acquainting himself with the latest and most improved methods of placer mining.  While he remains at the diggings he gives his personal attention to the direction of the work and keeps in touch with all its numerous details.  He does not, however, overlook the comforts and luxuries of life, even while sojourning in the Klondike.  His residence at No. 6 is a commodious, two-story structure, the only one of its kind on the creek.

It is lighted throughout by electricity and is furnished with all the conveniences and luxuries that good taste and experience might suggest and money procure.  A stranger entering the house is impressed immediately with the fact that feminine influence is present.  The tastefully arranged and daintily decorated rooms betray this, even before Mrs. Berry, the presiding genius of the household, is met with.  Mrs. Berry accompanies her husband on his trips in and out of the country, and remains with him on the claim during the sluicing season.  She takes great pride in her Klondike home, and its surroundings.  She rejoices especially in the possession of two beautiful Jersey cows, which were purchased in Dawson for $500 and $750 respectively.  The dairy is always plentifully supplied with butter and milk, and last winter supplied many a poor sick fellow on the creek with nourishment he otherwise would have been unable to obtain.  The cows find splendid grazing on the creek, and do as well, if not better, than in California.  Six gallons of milk per day is the average output of the dairy, which Mrs. Berry values more highly than many of the rich pans that come from her husband's claim.

Mr. and Mrs. Berry have a beautiful collection of nuggets, ranging in value from $118 down.

He found this large nugget since his return from the outside last spring.

Mr. Berry's great wealth has in no way affected his individual character, and he is today the same genial and approachable man he was before he became famous as an Eldorado King.

During his absence on the outside he leaves all his interests in charge of Mr. J. H. Hammel, who himself is an old experienced California miner.  Under his careful and systematic direction the Berry properties are handled in a manner most satisfactory to the owner.

Source: The Klondike Nugget, November 1, 1899.

   
BURPEE, ISAAC
  The first claim staked on Bonanza after George Carmack's world-famous discovery, was 14 below and it was located by H. F. Waugh, a native of New Brunswick.  This young and adventurous man came into the Yukon in the early part of 1896 and prospected in the Hootalinqua country.  Finding prospects unpromising he started for the Fortymile diggings with two partners, but stopped off at the Klondike just at the time of Carmack's discovery.  The men went up Bonanza gulch at once and stake Nos. 14, 15 and 16 below, choosing the location because of surface indications and the presence of a bend in the creek at that point.  Their judgment proved true, for all the claims proved to be very rich.  On No. 14, Mr. Waugh's claim, the first log cabin built on Bonanza was located and it was occupied by the first mining recorder of the district.  The first large pan of gold taken from Bonanza was also found on No. 14.  Mr. Waugh, it will therefore be seen, was a sort of history maker.

In the spring of '98 Mr. Isaac Burpee, also of New Brunswick, came to the Klondike and purchased the interests of the other partners in the three claims.  He and Mr. Waugh have since then acquired Nos. 16 and 17 above on Hunker, which are producers of exceptional richness.

The gentlemen are both young, energetic and industrious, with good business ability, and promise to become heavy holders of good properties, as they deserve.

Source: The Klondike Nugget, November 1, 1899.

   
BURT, HERBERT
  The above named gentleman is the proprietor of the Dominion Central hotel, located at 36 below upper discovery on Dominion creek.  Mr. Burt was formerly associated with the Yukon Trading Company, but in May last established himself in the hotel business.  He originally came to the Yukon country in the spring of 1897, via St. Michaels, stopping at Circle City.  From there he returned again to the States and came into Dawson by the up-river route in the spring of 1898.  Last winter he engaged in the business of freighting between Dawson and Bonanza and Eldorado creeks.  He is still successfully conducting his freighting business, making use at the present time of six pack animals.

In connection with his hotel, he carries a large line of general merchandise in which he is rapidly working up a fine business.  During the approaching winter he will operate a stage line between his hotel and Dawson, via Hunker creek.

The new Dominion Central hotel is a pretentious and attractive building, and the reputation earned by the house for excellent services is an indication of what the traveler may expect in the new institution.

The hotel has ten large and completely fitted bed rooms.  The carpeted floors and spring mattresses are an agreeable surprise to all who have occasion to patronize the house.  In fact the entire interior of the hotel is rather suggestive of what one may find in similar institutions in the states rather than of a hotel in the Klondike.

A bunk house in connection with the hotel is now in course of construction, and will shortly be ready for occupancy.

In consequence of a broad gauge policy the hotel enjoys a continually increasing reputation as a first class stopping place and mine host Burt naturally and justly feels proud of his success.

Klondike Nugget, November 1, 1899.

   
DAY BROTHERS
  Two hustling, energetic and successful Klondikers are found in the well-known Day brothers, Hugh and A. H., and none are more deserving of their good fortune than they.  Hugh Day first came into the country in 1884, and after prospecting for a time in the upper country he floated down the Yukon to the Stewart, where he put in two years very industriously - 1885 and 1886.

Hearing of the strike at Fortymile, he went there, where he was joined by his brother, A. H.  In '96, when the strike on Bonanza had become known, the brothers came to the Klondike together and have since been associated in a large number of business and mining enterprises.

Among their belongings are a seven-eighths interest in No. 30 below on Bonanza, where they employ 24 men in three shifts of eight hours each, and work both summer and winter.  They also own interests in No. 31 below on Bonanza and No. 11 above on Bear, both of which are first-class properties. 

Both are practical miners of wide experience, as their long residence in this country would indicate, and give their personal attention to the superintendency of their claims.  These are also the gentlemen for whom the Day addition to Dawson is named.  It is correctly reported of Hugh Day that he has made ten trips to the outside world, which is an achievement not connected with the name of any other Klondiker, so far as The Nugget has been able to ascertain.

Source: The Klondike Nugget, November 1, 1899.

   
ENDELMAN, MAX
   Grand Forks is a bustling little town at the junction of the world-famous Eldorado and Bonanza creeks, and the pride of this village is the Gold Hill hotel, which is one of the best hotels in the Yukon territory.  It was erected and fitted up by Max Endleman in the early part of this year and has so rapidly won its way into public favor that it is accorded a leading position among the first-class hotels of this territory.  It is large and roomy, and constructed and fitted up with a view to comfort as well as convenience.  In point of cuisine it is unsurpassed anywhere in the Klondike country.  Mr. Endleman gives his personal attention to the hotel, though the management is vested in Mr. William Shooler, whose popular business methods coupled with those of Mine Host Endleman, assures a continuation of public favor. 

In 1886, Max Endleman came to Alaska, making his headquarters at Juneau, and was connected with the Alaskan government for many years, serving with distinction as United States marshal.  When the Bonanza discovery was made he joined the rush to the Klondike and at once became identified with and figured conspicuously in the development of the mining interests of Eldorado and other creeks. 

He is well posted on the location and condition off the various mining sections of the country and well versed on mining topics generally.  He is possessed of a fund of valuable information to prospectors and investors, and his geniality has won him an extensive friendship and acquaintance throughout the surrounding country, especially among the traveling public.

Source: The Klondike Nugget, November 1, 1899.

   
FOSTER, WILLIAM
  As is well known among all residents of the Yukon territory, the bars on Stewart river had yielded good returns long before the Klondike gold fields were known or even thought of.  Among the early prospectors on the first named stream was William Foster, the subject of this sketch.  Mr. Foster, like many others of our successful men, had been a miner by occupation long before he came into the Yukon country.  It was in the year 1886 that he first located on the Stewart.  After 12 months spent in bar digging and prospecting with varying results he went to the Fortymile district in which camp he remained for another year.

At the expiration of that time he returned to the Outside and accepted a position with the Treadwell Mining Company, with whom he remained for a period of nine years.

He still retained, however, a lingering feeling that there was gold in the Yukon and when the strike of '97 was reported outside, he left immediately for Dawson.

His years of experience, both in placer and quartz mining, made his services at once in demand and he was engaged by Messrs. Blake and Conrad to superintend the development of their property, No. 15 above discovery on Bonanza creek, with whom he has remained ever since.  He will work a crew of about 20 men during the approaching winter.  Mr. Foster understands thoroughly the handling of men and the methods which he has applied in the working of No. 15 have resulted most satisfactorily.

Klondike Nugget, November 1, 1899.

   
GATES, HUMBOLDT
  Humboldt Gates is a native of Kilburn, Wis., but was removed to California at a tender age.  Nurtured amidst scenes and stories of one of the greatest gold stampedes the world ever knew, it is not at all surprising that at the age of 19 he struck out for a new world in a search for the precious yellow metal which is, after all, the inspiration of the world.  It was the spring of 1894, before Klondike was dreamed of, that the subject of our sketch crossed the snowy heights of Chilcoot, built his boat on Lake Marsh, and, with his year's provisions, launched his craft and embarked upon the mighty Yukon for he knew not whither Fortymile was then the great camp on the Yukon, and, without much loss of time the industrious Gates was at work upon Miller creek, upon a claim staked by himself.  He joined in the stampede of '96 to the newly discovered gold fields of the Klondike and arrived there in time to find the new Bonanza creek staked to the headwaters.  However, the then "Whipple" creek - now Eldorado had vacant ground yet, and No. 28 was staked and recorded in the name of Humboldt Gates.  The most wonderful discoveries on that stream the following winter, which made millionaires by the dozen and turned the heads of a world, gave the subject of this sketch at once ample means to follow his bent and speculate to his hearth's content.  How well he invested his holdings will show.  While many an older miner struck greater luck at the first go off, we cannot readily point out another than Alex McDonald himself who more substantially and deservedly profited by his first good luck than Humboldt Gates.

To illustrate the character of our subject a story is told how in the height of the Eldorado staking excitement of 1896-7, learning of the critical condition of a miner at the then "Lousetown," he did not hesitate a moment in speeding away for Fortymile for the only qualified practitioner in the land.  That the wounded man's life was saved by this promptness is only one of the many incidents of an eventful life.  Many stories are also told of his prowess as a hunter, the results of his skill in tis line having in the early days provided many a miner's table with the delicacy of fresh meat in midwinter.

Notwithstanding his remarkable success, Humboldt is one of the most easily approached men in the district.  Though of rigidly correct habits himself, his leniency with the foibles of his brother miners retains to him the hearty estimation which he early secured.  Today, though a wealthy man, his frequent references to the past show him to retain a warm place in his heart for the people and places of the early days for the time when miners were more like brothers than eager rivals.

At the present time Mr. Gates is buffeting with the ice on the Yukon river.  One scow of machinery and provisions out of the three was wrecked a few weeks ago in Miles canyon and one man lost.  The balance are frozen in on the way down.  Mr. Gates is a man of resources in extremity, and getting frozen in on the Yukon, half way to Dawson, while of sufficient importance to break the fortunes of some men will prove but one more difficulty overcome to this manly young fellow, who at 19 years of age had the courage to face a new life in the unknown regions of the far north.

Mr. Gates has had the cheering companionship of a number of his relatives in Dawson at various times.  His step0father C. W. Hall, has acaquired several good interests, as has also a brother, Edgar Gates, while Miss Mimosa Gates, a most estimable sister, by an unusual business acumen, has become one of the few self-made young ladies of America.

Humboldt Gates and Dr. L. O. Wilcoxon

For their age there are not two as successful Klondikers on the Yukon as the subject of this sketch.  Indeed, it is doubtful if there are many such in the world.  Read the following stupendous list of gilt-edge properties and take into consideration the fact that not a dollar is owing on any of it:

12 below on Hunker.
24 below on Hunker.
6 below upper on Dominion.
11 above lower on Dominion.
8 below on Sulphur.
18 below on Sulphur.
29 below on Sulphur.
42 below on Sulphur.
51 below on Sulphur.
74a below on Sulphur.
112 below on Sulphur.
10 left fork, Eureka.  

Everyone of the above is either being worked or undergoing extensive preparations for work.  Then there are the following, all bearing the name of Gates or Wilcoxon, or both:

"Cariboo," quartz claim, Hunker.
Two hillside claims, 11 above on bonanza.
5 on Last Chance.
5 and 6 on Green gulch.
11 on Pure Gold.
23 above on American creek.
20 below on American creek.

Besides the foregoing the young "hustlers" have several other claims on the Yukon and extensive copper and quartz holdings at Haines' Mission and Juneau.

The combined age of Messrs Gates and Wilcoxon are not much more than that of the average Yukoner, Mr. Gates being but 24 and Mr. wilcoxon 26 - a total of but 50 years.  But in this rapid land of the northwest it is not age that counts, but the qualities of courage, brain and brawn.  These, our subjects have in large degree.  Their grand good fortune is in no particular the result of luck, but of industry, intelligent grasp of opportunity, and a courage which must be born in a man, for it can never be acquired.  Both men are of absolutely correct demeanor, perfectly upright in their dealings, and inspire the confidence of all with whom they are thrown in contact, to an unusual degree.  Both are perfect specimens of physical manhood - men to whom the rigors of an arctic clime are mere nothings - simple invigorators - and the enforced "mushing" of this strange land merely invigorators and appetizers for the next meal.

To the confidence of youth is added the wisdom of experience, which, together with native shrewdness has landed them upon a wave of prosperity which will quickly place them in a position, though only yet on the threshold of life, to pursue their own ambitions no matter to what heights they may soar.

Source: The Klondike Nugget, November 1, 1899.

   
HAMMELL, M. A.
  There is located on the east side of Second avenue, between Third and Fourth streets, a well-stocked fancy and staple grocery store, managed and conducted by Mr. M. A. Hammell. 

Mr. Hammell was born in Mt. Gilead, Ohio, in 1855; he came west in 1871, and at Oasis, Iowa, in 1879, he was married to the estimable woman who is now his wife.  For a number of years, he was engaged in commercial business in the state of Montana.  In 1885, Mr. Hammell first came to Juneau, Alaska, where he devoted his attention to general merchandising.  He and his wife enjoy the distinction of being the first persons to transport a complete outfit over the Skagway trail during the rush of 1897.  Upon arriving in Dawson in the summer of that year, his services were secured by the N.A.T.&T. Co., with whom he remained until August, 1899.  Then he opened his present establishment.

His stock comprises every food commodity required in the family household or in the miner's cabin.

Klondike Nugget, November 1, 1899.

   
HOBBS, O. W.
  The Dawson Sawmill and Building company's establishment is the most complete of its kind in the Yukon territory. 

Mr. O. W. Hobbs is the sole owner and proprietor.  He arrived in Dawson in the spring of 1897, and by making a circular saw from pieces of an old whipsaw and picking up a stray boiler and engine that had wandered into the country, he was soon sawing lumber, and manufacturing store and office fixtures. 

From this modest beginning, a plant representing a cash investment of $100,000 stands today as a proof of his enterprise and confidence in the stability of the town.  In connection with his sawmill, Mr. Hobbs operates a large planing mill and wood working department in which is manufactured a variety of articles that range in quality from a dressed board to a roller top office desk.  He also carries for sale a full line of builders hardware, wall and tar paper. 

His undertaking establishment is the best in the territory, and it contains the only assortment of burial cloths and casket trimmings north of Juneau.  This department is managed by an expert in the art of embalming bodies.

Last summer Mr. Hobbs directed his attention to the production of brick and lime, in addition to his other interests.  His brick kiln is located a short distance from Dawson, up the Yukon.  A splendid bed of clay has been uncovered, from which there has been made already 150,000 of fine building brick.  The capacity of the kiln is 1,000 bricks per day.  The lime is secured about ten miles this side of Sixtymile.  The deposit is extensive, and the product is of excellent quality and well adapted for building purposes.  The success of Mr. O. W. Hobbs is well deserved.

Klondike Nugget, November 1, 1899.

   
JOHNSON, J. SLOAN
  It has been the custom of designate those men who came to Dawson before the winter of '97 as "sour doughs."  Subsequent arrivals are commonly known by the tern "cheechako."  Among this latter class is J. Sloan Johnson, who reached Dawson on the 11th of May, 1898.

Mr. Johnson is a miner of long years of experience and a specialist on mineral formations and geological structures.

He lost no time looking about for nuggets in Dawson, but went immediately up the creeks in order to investigate the district for himself, from the standpoint of a geologist of practical experience.

After satisfying himself as to the future of the country, Mr. Johnson established himself at No. 25 below discovery on Bonanza creek, and began examining and experting properties for buyers.  His headquarters have been on the same claim during his entire stay in the Klondike, and in a period of less than 12 months he disposed of properties aggregating in value more than $235,000.  Of all the properties he has handled, fully 99 per cent has proven valuable and satisfactory to the purchasers.

While acting as agent for other parties, Mr. Johnson has not overlooked picking up an occasional good buy for himself, all of which have resulted very satisfactorily.

Having been tendered the superintendency of the great Garabaldi mine in Mariposa County, California, he has disposed of all his Klondike interests and has left for the outside.  The Garabaldi is one of California's famous mines, having now been actively worked for a period of more than 40 years.

There is a romantic feature in Mr. Johnson's life, which he refers to with apparent pleasure.  On the day previous to his departure from San Francisco for Dawson he was married.  His wife of one day bravely consented to his proposed trip into the Klondike, upon agreement that he should send for her at as early a date as possible.  Mr. Johnson was as good as his word and early last spring sent for his wife, who joined him in June last.

Mrs. Johnson accompanied her husband on his return trip to California, which state she regards as her home.

Mr. Johnson's California headquarters will be with the Garibaldi Gold Mining and Development Co., Room 6, Nevada block, San Francisco.

Source: The Klondike Nugget, November 1, 1899.

   
JOSLIN, FALCON
  Mr. Falcon Joslin, the subject of our sketch, is the Dawson member of the Seattle firm of lawyers, "Martin, Joslin and Griffin."  He was among the very first lawyers to reach the course of the 1897 gold seekers.  It is with amusement he relates how upon his arrival there were neither law courts, lawyers nor law practice.  The most primitive law was dispensed by the commander of the police detachment, while the gold-commissioner decided hundred thousand dollar claim cases with the ignorance of law and delicious abandon of a child playing at keeping house.

To begin at the beginning, Messrs. Joslin and Griffin, two partners of the Seattle firm, joined in the stampede to the new land of gold in the summer of 1897, and after killing the last of their 20 horses was tethered on the hills to browse and hung himself by the neck in despair by throwing himself over the cliff.  Not at all disconcerted though feeling sorrow for the faithful horses, the two determined partners loaded their outfits onto a boat and, with the usual adventurous and hair breadth escapes incident to the trip reached Dawson in just 60 days from the time of leaving Skagway.  Though thoroughly resolved to try their fortunes at mining upon their arrival at Dawson the partners found mining business in such a chaotic state from the lack of proper legal advice on property and personal rights that they at once saw their opportunity and opened up an office.  Deeds, bills of sale, options and contracts involving hundreds of thousands of dollars had been carelessly drawn up without legal form on angular scraps of paper of all colors and sizes, and from the lack of anyone familiar with conveyancing so much valuable property was on the ragged edge of insecurity, the subject of our sketch, instantly upon his arrival found his services in such urgent demand as to decide him at once that the pick and prospect pan were not for him.

Judge McGuire came in over the ice in February and opened the first court in the Yukon territory, then the Yukon district - and for a time Mr. Joslin, though an American, was allowed to practice in open court.  From then until the present time, Mr. Joslin has conducted a highly successful legal brokerage and business claims are managed for absentee owners in turst by him, while his ten years' practice in Seattle gave him in insight into corporation law most invaluable in this district.  Two important milling concerns availed themselves of his services to close up their affairs - the Arctic and Kerry companies, while a third, the White river mill, is still being operated in trust by him.  The incorporation of important local concerns has been naturally placed in the hands of this gentleman who for years was the counsel of some of the largest Seattle concerns.

The firm lost some $60,000 in drafts, notes and mortgages in the destroyed vaults of the Bank of British North America in the big Dawson fire, but by a combination of good fortune and good management have been able to duplicate everything without the actual loss of a dollar.  Clients with property in trust will appreciate this more than the average reader.  Mr. Joslin has owned and owns yet, numerous pieces of Klondike property, but it is in his holdings on the famed Jack Wade creek in the Fortymile district that he prides himself most of all.  The investments were made after personal inspection, and a slight vanity when judgment is so amply borne out by developments as has been the case on Jack Wade creek, is both natural and excusable.

Mr. Griffin has returned to the Seattle office of the firm as the general prosperity on the coast has been reflected in the firm's business, and it has grown beyond the power of one gentleman to control.  Mr. Joslin has sole control of the Dawson affairs of the concern and will remain to care for their interests and to carry out the many trusts imposed by absentees in Martin, Joslin and Griffin.

Source: The Klondike Nugget, November 1, 1899.

   
LAURITZEN, P. J.
  A splendid illustration of Klondike pluck, industry and success is found in the career of Mr. P. J. Lauritzen, who operates a claim on the famous Adams hill.  The gentleman came originally from New York, where he followed the profession of architect and engineer.  In 1897 he went to the Tanana river country, where he remained until June of '98, when he came to the Klondike.  He was joined here by his wife and son, and the first named was fortunate enough to secure a piece of ground 110x130 feet in dimensions on Adams hill.  Being an engineer, a practical man and a worker, Mr. Lauritzen has been more successful than most of his fellows.  He connected the claim on Adams hill with Bonanza creek by means of a tramway, which he constructed in just 12 days, and on this he conveys the pay-dirt to the creek to be sluiced.  The claim is a very rich one, and Mr. Lauritzen has reaped a golden reward for his industry.  He is possessed of excellent judgment in mining matters and is one of the safest buyers in the country, as is attested by the richness of his possessions on Sulphur and Dominion creeks.  The gentleman evidently regards the future of the Klondike from a most self-satisfied standpoint, and if no untoward event interposes he will one day be enumerated among the leading individual holders in the country. 

Source: The Klondike Nugget, November 1, 1899.

   
LEE, JOHN B.
  The hardships and dangers that men have undergone in reaching the Yukon gold fields can never be realistically portrayed on paper.  They can be appreciated only by the man who has been there.  To understand it all requires the actual experience.  It requires that the man who would know what hardship is should take his pack on his back and climb the Chilkoot summit in the midst of blinding blizzards.

It requires that he should go into the woods and whipsaw his lumber and launch his own boat at the headwaters of the mighty Yukon.  Let him bring his frail craft through the dangerous succession of lakes and rivers.  Let him navigate the rapids and avoid, if he can, the rocks in the treacherous Thirty-mile that loom up to impede his progress at every twist and turn in the stream.  And then, when he reaches the interior, let him again assume his pack.  Let him travel over hills and through swamps and morasses, contesting every inch of the way with countless swarms of mosquitoes, following blind trail or guiding himself by the tread of the mountains or the run of the creeks.  Let him be out in the open during the middle of winter, perhaps with nothing to eat, a single blanket to shield him from the fierceness of winter blasts and with no accurate knowledge of his whereabouts.  It is through such experiences as those that men came to know the meaning of hardship, and it was after passing through just such experiences that John B. Lee, the subject of this sketch, came to fortune on Eldorado creek.

Mr. Lee hails from Snohomish county, Washington, and came to Alaska during the early days of the Fortymile excitement.  When the Klondike discovery was made he came on with the rush from Fortymile, securing a half interest in No. 32 Eldorado, one of the richest claims on the creek.  He also owns two interests on Sulphur below discovery, and one-half of No. 4 on Gay gulch.

Mr. Lee and his pleasant little wife are now located on his Eldorado property, where he employs and actively superintends 24 men, running day and night shifts.

He is a mining man of a number of years' experience and was quick to realize that the crude methods of working frozen ground which had previously prevailed in the Yukon could be vastly improved.  In consequence, he has placed a steam plant upon his property, for the double purpose of thawing and hoisting the dirt and pumping water for sluicing purposes.

In addition to his interest in 32, Mr. Lee has also been connected with the development of several others of the richest claims on Eldorado creek, his various interests having netted him a handsome fortune.

Mr. Lee is essentially a modest man, who dislikes notoriety of any kind.  He prefers to enjoy the results of his success in the Yukon in quiet without the spectacular accompaniment of sensational newspaper displays.  He is an open-hearted and generous friend, to which fact many who have been the recipients of his acts of kindness can testify.

Source: The Klondike Nugget, November 1, 1899.

   
LOWE, RICHARD R.
  Richard R. Lowe is a name not often heard in the Klondike, yet it belongs to a gentleman who is known and esteemed from one end of the Yukon to the other.  "Dick" Lowe was one of the noted seven who made the original gold discovery in the Black hills, and was also a prominent figure in the development of the Coeur de-Alene country.  From there he went to Juneau, Alaska, and in 1890 he crossed the famous Chilcoot into the little known country of the Yukon.  After prospecting on the upper waters for a time, he floated down to Circle City, where he was when the famous discovery was made on Bonanza.  He came to the Klondike as soon thereafter as possible, which was in 1897 and located his present ground, which is a fraction adjoining No. 2 above on Bonanza, and at the mouth of Skookum.

Dick Lowe's traction is known to everybody in the Klondike as one of the richest pieces of ground in the district.  It has doubtless produced more gold than any other piece of like size.  The claim has been working 14 men in two shifts of seven men each, and they are just closing up the summer's work.  Personally, Mr. Lowe is a miner of extensive experience and excellent judgment; he is a rustler of the best quality and is sensibly devoting a large portion of his gold to the acquisition of new properties, the latest of which is in the Jack Wade district.  He is an exceptionally companionable fellow, whom anyone might be happy and proud to call his friend.

Klondike Nugget, November 1, 1899.

   
McNAMEE, JAMES
  There is no one in the Klondike but knows popular James McNamee, and there are none but admire his genial, broad-gauged and open-hearted ways.  The gentleman was among the early argonauts of the Yukon, having made the perilous trip in 1889.  Hardship and toil were the constant companions of the hardy prospector then, as those who have since come in, have reason to know, and those were days when the best and worst traits of man were developed.  Out of this task was evolved the "Jimmy" McNamee of today - the genial, open-hearted, accommodating sourdough.  He located first, like most of his fellows, in the Fortymile country, and stayed with it until the big strike on Bonanza.  Joining the rush which followed, he located No. 60 above on Bonanza, and has since acquired No. 26 below on Bonanza, No. 6 above on Victoria, No. 8 on Homestead, a third interest in No. 21 below on Hunker and all of No. 19 above on Hunker.  He also holds a quarter interest in the belongings of a company which owns Nos. 8, 9, 27 and 28 above on Hunker, Nos. 14 and 15 Eldorado and No. 32 above on Bonanza.  It will thus be seen that Mr. McNamee is one of the largest and richest holders of property, and is justly classed among the celebrated Klondike kings.

Mr. McNamee's genial ways and open-heartedness have surrounded him with a wide circle of friends in whom he finds his chief delight.  He is fond of devoting his large wealth to their gratification and to the alleviation of the sufferings of the unfortunate, though his gifts are always extended in the modest, unostentatious manner, which indicates a genuineness of spirit which prompts him.  hat he will live to a green old age, with faculty to enjoy his wealth to the end, is the earnest wish of all who know him.

Klondike Nugget, November 1, 1899.

   
MATLOCK, GEORGE H.
  Among the well-known, but most modest of the Bonanza claim owners is George H. Matlock, a partner of James Monroe in No. 16 above on Bonanza.

This gentleman, like the other old timers, first located in the lower country in 1887, coming from the state of Iowa.  He came to the Klondike with the rush in 1807 and located the claim with which his name has become connected.

He is a pleasant gentleman, somewhat retiring, but being widely known, just the same, through his kindly ways and high integrity.

No. 16 is not so rich as some of the claims which have made Bonanza world-famous; but it is a good claim, just the same, and is making its owners rich men.  The paystreak is very wide and deep, and the pay uniform, which are the best feaures of a good claim.

Mr. Matlock works a corps of ten men on his ground, using the most approved methods, and has proven very successful.

Source: The Klondike Nugget, November 1, 1899.

   
PINSKA, MARTIN A.
  Probably no firm in Dawson is better or more favorably known than that of Sargent and Pinska, whose line of clothing, furnishing goods, hats, shoes, and furs, is one of the finest in the city.

Mr. Charles S. Sargeant is from Duluth, Minn.  He came to Alaska in the fall of 1897, and spent the following winter in Skagway.  He arrived in Dawson in July 1898 and proceeded to direct his attention to mining.

Mr. Martin A. Pinska came from St. Paul, Minn., to Dawson in September, 1898.  He brought with him a large stock of furs, which was displayed in a neat store on the water front, opposite the old Pioneer.  In February, 1899, the present partnership was formed.  After suffering losss by fire, the firm conducted business for some time on Second avenue.  This summer they removed to their present stand, which is situated on the corner of First avenue and Second street - the best location in the city.  During the summer, the firm secured a large patronage by having the largest and finest stock of shoes in the territory.  Next December one of the partners will make a trip Outside over the ice.  Stock will be selected from the principal houses of New York, Boston and Montreal, and no expense will be spared in landing it in Dawson early next spring.

Klondike Nugget, November 1, 1899.

   
RHOADS, L. B.
  One of the most successful and competent mine superintendents in the Klondike is L. B. Rhoads, of Nos. 21 and 23 above on Bonanza.  Mr. Rhoads was the original locator of No. 21, and purchased No. 23, but sold them to the Reliance Mining and Trading Co., who retained him as superintendent for their properties, which position he has held since 1897.  No. 23 is not being worked, but on No. 21 Mr. Rhoads has a corps of 23 men, employed in two shifts of ten hours each.  Both are rich claims, and a fortune is being turned out each year from the one now under the pick and shovel.  Mr. Rhoads uses the latest methods obtainable in his work, and the claim is one of the most interesting in the Klondike to the many people who visit it.

Mr. Rhoads came from Colorado and Wyoming, where he had been engaged in placer and quartz mining since 1882.  In the springs of 1805 he located in the Fortymile district and the next year removed to the Klondike.  He has therefore, grown up with the country, obtaining a wide knowledge of its conditions and the most successful methods for working its mines; this, with his extensive experience on the Outside and the excellent judgment which he possesses, explains his success in the conduct of famous 21.  Mr. Rhoads is, personally, of a very genial disposition, and delights in the possession, and delights in the possession of a host of warm friends, among whom are most of those who knew him in the trying days of '95-6.

Klondike Nugget, November 1, 1899.

   
ROGERS, DR. T. N.
  The gold discovery of Bonanza and Eldorado creeks, which made the Klondike country famous throughout the world, brought us doctors, lawyers, preachers and men of every profession, as well as the laity of every clime and country, among whom was some of the best talent that culture and natural ability could produce.  An illustration of this fact is that during the early part of 1898, Dr. T. N. Rogers, of Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan, arrived in Dawson and began the practice of his profession.  In this country, as well as elsewhere, merit wins and the doctor went immediately into a good practice and stands exceedingly well in his profession.  Seeing the advantages of a location in Grand Forks he moved his office there in March of this year.  Being fully awake to the speculative opportunities here he has acquired some valuable mining properties, owning claims on Little Blanche creek, No. 13 Adams, No. 51a Eldorado, the four hillside claims opposite Nos. 34 and 35 on the right limit, upper Bonanza, and is largely interested in claims Nos. 3 and 8, Whitman gulch, and two benches off the right limit of upper Bonanza. 

The doctor was reared on the farm, where his youthful training and education was fashioned after the good old-time way and his early manhood spent in teaching school.  He is a graduate of the Normal School of Ottawa and the Toronto Medical University.  At Sault Ste. Marie he established the only hospital in the place, which he and his partner yet own ad conduct, and which has won distinction as one of the leading institutions of its kind in the Northwest.  Notwithstanding his lucrative professional interests at his Michigan home he is a permanent fixture in the Yukon and Grand Forks is to be congratulated on securing his location.  The doctor left recently for a visit to the Outside.

Klondike Nugget, November 1, 1899.

   
SARGEANT, CHARLES S.
  Probably no firm in Dawson is better or more favorably known than that of Sargent and Pinska, whose line of clothing, furnishing goods, hats, shoes, and furs, is one of the finest in the city.

Mr. Charles S. Sargeant is from Duluth, Minn.  He came to Alaska in the fall of 1897, and spent the following winter in Skagway.  He arrived in Dawson in July 1898 and proceeded to direct his attention to mining.

Mr. Martin A. Pinska came from St. Paul, Minn., to Dawson in September, 1898.  He brought with him a large stock of furs, which was displayed in a neat store on the water front, opposite the old Pioneer.  In February, 1899, the present partnership was formed.  After suffering losss by fire, the firm conducted business for some time on Second avenue.  This summer they removed to their present stand, which is situated on the corner of First avenue and Second street - the best location in the city.  During the summer, the firm secured a large patronage by having the largest and finest stock of shoes in the territory.  Next December one of the partners will make a trip Outside over the ice.  Stock will be selected from the principal houses of New York, Boston and Montreal, and no expense will be spared in landing it in Dawson early next spring.

Klondike Nugget, November 1, 1899.

   
SPARKS, GEORGE F.
  Among the throng who built their boats at the lakes in the spring of '98 and piloted their own craft down the river to Dawson was the subject of this sketch, George F. Sparks, who tied his boat alongside the water front of the city in July of that year.  Mr. Sparks had but one object in view in connection with thousands of his fellow argonauts and immediately took such steps as in his judgment would best enable him to realize his expectations.

Ascertaining the fact very rapidly that there were no choice Eldorado claims left un-staked, Mr. Sparks proceeded to look for such opportunities as might present themselves.  It was at this time that Gold Hill, since famous the world over, began giving indications which promised great things for the future.  The attention of Mr. Sparks and his partner, Mr. W. A. Whitley, was attracted toward the hill as a promising spot for investment.  It was contrary to all tradition that gold should be found on the hill tops, but these gentlemen rather placed their faith in the theory that gold is exactly where it is found.  After carefully examining the field, they accepted an offer to purchase an interest in the well-known Travarro claim, located on the second tier off the left limit of No. 2 Eldorado creek.

The claim is considered to be one of the richest on the hill, having already produced several times the purchase price of $20,000.  The claim, however, has not as yet begun to be worked out, and thousands of dollars are still in the gold laden gravel waiting to be taken out.

The claim is celebrated for the number and beauty of the nuggets which have been taken from it.  Many of them have been sent to the Outside as keepsakes owing to their size and the oddity of the shapes they assume.  Single pans running as high as $96 have been found and by no means in exceptional instances.

While working their rich Gold Hill ground, Messrs. Sparks and Whitley have not been unmindful of other opportunities and now are possessed of several properties, all of proved value.

They have recently bought into a bench off of No. 23 below discovery Bonanza, on the left limit, paying $10,000 for their interest.  This piece of property, as far as prospected, is proving as rich as their Gold Hill claim.  They are working both of these properties with the latest approved machinery.

Messrs. Sparks and Whitley are natives of California, and possess the natural miner's instinct.  Each had spent a number of years in the various pursuits of mining prior to the Klondike excitement.  Their cabin is noted as a center of pleasant hospitality, to which their friends who have been the recipients thereof can well testify.

Klondike Nugget, November 1, 1899.

   
STEVENSON, JOHN W.
  Hoffman House.

Without doubt the Hoffman house is one of the most modern and most complete establishments of the kind in Dawson.  It is situated  on the east side of First avenue, between Second and Third streets.  The first floor of the main building is occupied by the saloon and bar.  The finest of liquors and cigars are dispensed by polite attendants and at reasonable prices.  At the entrance to this part of the establishment, there is located the office, which is neatly furnished, and which contains the only Diebold time lock safe in the Yukon territory.  The second and third floors of the main building are comprised of sleeping apartments, which are fitted with every modern convenience.  Adjoining the rear of the main building, has been constructed the cafe addition, the ground floor of which contains a large horse-shoe eating counter and five tables.  The second floor of the cafe is divided into ten private boxes, especially arranged for exclusive patrons.  An expert chef superintends the culinary department.  In connection with the cafe, there are a bakery, in charge of an experienced baker, and a butcher shop conducted by an experienced butcher.  The store house is filled with eatables of all description, no inconsiderable portion of which are 30 head of dressed corn-fed beef, direct from Kansas City, and 4,000 pounds of moose, bear and cariboo meats.  This establishment feeds 1,200 people daily. 

Mr. John W. Stevenson is the sole proprietor and manager of this vast enterprise.  He is a native of Shasta county, California, and was born in 1858.  His lifetime has been devoted to the hotel business; and he has conducted successfully such establishments in San Bernardino, Redlands and Los Angeles, California.  On October 20th, 1898, Mr. Stevenson arrived in Dawson.  He immediately opened the Madden house cafe, but a constant and rapid increase of patronage necessitated his removal to his present quarters on July 4th of this year.  The experience and ability of Mr. Stevenson have earned for him the respect and confidence of his fellow men.  His invested capital in the Hoffman house amounts to the sum of $35,000.  Mr. Stevenson has every confidence in the future of Dawson and has demonstrated his faith accordingly.

Klondike Nugget, November 1, 1899.

   
SUTTON, J. H.
  J. H. Sutton is one of the pioneers who has largely aided in the development of this country.  He is a native of New Castle, New Brunswick, and after many years spent on the frontier of the Northwestern country, emigrated to Alaska in 1897.

Here he engaged largely in freighting for the Canadian government, packing immense quantities of government provisions over the passes when the trip was the most hazardous.  After a very successful season, in the spring of '98 he continued on to Dawson, bringing in with him a consignment of provisions, which he sold at an immense profit. 

He then became interested largely in mining properties, and in the fall of '99 received from the Canadian government a contract to build a public road along the ridge.

As the contract was given late in the fall, it necessitated the employment of a large force of men to complete it before winter interfered with its progress, and Mr. Sutton rushed it through with the utmost expedition, paying for labor the sum of $8 per day to each laborer, probably the highest wages ever paid for unskilled labor on any road in the history of this country.  The road is in splendid condition, and the satisfaction it merits from all who have traveled over it, is an evidence of the ability of its builder.

Klondike Nugget, November 1, 1899.

   
TOZIER, LEROY
  Leroy Tozier is a native of Portland, Oregon.  He came to the Klondike in the fall of 1897, and soon thereafter established himself in the business of mining brokerage in partnership with Lincoln Davis, under the firm name of Tozier & Davis.  The firm had their office in a corner of the old Pioneer saloon building, and being one of the first to engage in their line were enabled to acquire valuable interests.  Mr. Davis sold his holdings in June, 1898, and returned to his home in Tacoma, Washington.  Mr. Tozier then formed a partnership with his former associate in Seattle.  Mr. N. D. Walling, a prominent attorney of Washington.  They control and own several large blocks of mining property in the Dawson district and in the American side of the Fortymile mining division, which were acquired during the partnership that terminated in June, 1899.  Mr. Tozier is now located in the Joslin building, No. 111 Second street, this city, where he is enjoying a lucrative brokerage business.  He is a member of the committee on mines, mining and smelting of the Dawson Board of Trade; takes an interest in public affairs, owns individual interests on Bonanza, Bear, Hunker, dominion, Sulphur and Quartz creeks and will undoubtedly meet with success in keeping with his efforts and ability.

Source: The Klondike Nugget, November 1, 1899.

   
TWEED, JAMES
  JAMES TWEED.

One of the successful early timers, and one who richly earned his good fortune by hardships and industry, is James Tweed, an Illinoisan.  This gentleman first located in 1895 in the Birch creek country, but in 1897 he came to the Klondike.  He located No. 30a Eldorado and worked the property for a time, but later he sold out and purchased an interest in No. 7 above on Bonanza.  This claim, which lies by the town of Eldorado and at the mouth of Eldorado creek, is a rich one, and is being systematically worked by Mr. Tweed, who strips the ground in the summer and employs eight men in shoveling into the sluice box; he also operates extensively in the winter.  Mr. Tweed is also interested in No. 4 above on Bear creek, which is exceptionally fine property.  Mr. Tweed has acquired a wide knowledge of mining affairs, and is thus able to operate in the most economical manner.  He is a clever, genial fellow, of easy ways and popular with his friends.

Klondike Nugget, November 1, 1899.

   
WAUGH, H. F.
  The first claim staked on Bonanza after George Carmack's world-famous discovery, was 14 below and it was located by H. F. Waugh, a native of New Brunswick.  This young and adventurous man came into the Yukon in the early part of 1896 and prospected in the Hootalinqua country.  Finding prospects unpromising he started for the Fortymile diggings with two partners, but stopped off at the Klondike just at the time of Carmack's discovery.  The men went up Bonanza gulch at once and stake Nos. 14, 15 and 16 below, choosing the location because of surface indications and the presence of a bend in the creek at that point.  Their judgment proved true, for all the claims proved to be very rich.  On No. 14, Mr. Waugh's claim, the first log cabin built on Bonanza was located and it was occupied by the first mining recorder of the district.  The first large pan of gold taken from Bonanza was also found on No. 14.  Mr. Waugh, it will therefore be seen, was a sort of history maker.

In the spring of '98 Mr. Isaac Burpee, also of New Brunswick, came to the Klondike and purchased the interests of the other partners in the three claims.  He and Mr. Waugh have since then acquired Nos. 16 and 17 above on Hunker, which are producers of exceptional richness.

The gentlemen are both young, energetic and industrious, with good business ability, and promise to become heavy holders of good properties, as they deserve.

Source: The Klondike Nugget, November 1, 1899.

   
WILCOXON, DR. L. ORVILLE
  The doctor is a native son of Iowa, though he grew to manhood in Chicago.  The medical profession attracted him and he followed his bent with an unwavering persistence which promised much in future conflicts for the hand of Dame Fortune.  Special studies were taken up at Rush Medical college, and it was in the class of '96 that he graduated from the C.H.M.C., and received his sheepskin.   Hospital practice was secured at Cook county hospital, besides several private sanitariums with which he was connected.

In 1898 the stories of Klondike's opportunities for the brave and the hardy caused him to quit his hospital and private practice and engage with one of the numerous Klondike expeditions as chief surgeon.  As was the case with so many of these Klondike companies, it went to pieces at the first reverses encountered.  The doctor found himself on the Klondike without the backing of his company, but fully equipped by nature to hold his own in any event.  No trip was too arduous, no hardship too considerable and the early winter found him well on his way to fortune.  During the winter a partnership between Messrs. Wilcoxon and Gates was brought about by a mutuality of interests, similarity of tastes, and the perfect trust between the two men.

In the summer of 1899 was consummated the one cherished romance of the doctor's life - he returned to civilization with ample means to appropriately welcome "the girl he left behind him," when he started out on his chase of fortune.  The Chicago Times-Herald, speaking of the wedding said: "The bride is a beautiful young lady.... and a talented young woman of a decided brunette type.  She is a graduate of Salina university, of Kansas."  The doctor's many friends united in congratulating him that in his but little more than one short year he was able to return to the girl of his choice with the wealth to establish a home beyond the heart's  fondest desire.  The young lady was Miss Claire Josephine Foote, the confidante of the young man's earliest ambition; his encouraging angel in his long struggle for an education and practice, and whose promise to wait had proved the one spur necessary to fully arm him to wrest fortune from an unwilling land that the ambition of a life might be consummated.

The doctor attends strictly to his numerous business affairs, the hour never being too late, the journey too long or the burden too heavy, wherever his business interests require him.

Humboldt Gates and Dr. L. O. Wilcoxon

For their age there are not two as successful Klondikers on the Yukon as the subject of this sketch.  Indeed, it is doubtful if there are many such in the world.  Read the following stupendous list of gilt-edge properties and take into consideration the fact that not a dollar is owing on any of it:

12 below on Hunker.
24 below on Hunker.
6 below upper on Dominion.
11 above lower on Dominion.
8 below on Sulphur.
18 below on Sulphur.
29 below on Sulphur.
42 below on Sulphur.
51 below on Sulphur.
74a below on Sulphur.
112 below on Sulphur.
10 left fork, Eureka.  

Everyone of the above is either being worked or undergoing extensive preparations for work.  Then there are the following, all bearing the name of Gates or Wilcoxon, or both:

"Cariboo," quartz claim, Hunker.
Two hillside claims, 11 above on bonanza.
5 on Last Chance.
5 and 6 on Green gulch.
11 on Pure Gold.
23 above on American creek.
20 below on American creek.

Besides the foregoing the young "hustlers" have several other claims on the Yukon and extensive copper and quartz holdings at Haines' Mission and Juneau.

The combined age of Messrs Gates and Wilcoxon are not much more than that of the average Yukoner, Mr. Gates being but 24 and Mr. wilcoxon 26 - a total of but 50 years.  But in this rapid land of the northwest it is not age that counts, but the qualities of courage, brain and brawn.  These, our subjects have in large degree.  Their grand good fortune is in no particular the result of luck, but of industry, intelligent grasp of opportunity, and a courage which must be born in a man, for it can never be acquired.  Both men are of absolutely correct demeanor, perfectly upright in their dealings, and inspire the confidence of all with whom they are thrown in contact, to an unusual degree.  Both are perfect specimens of physical manhood - men to whom the rigors of an arctic clime are mere nothings - simple invigorators - and the enforced "mushing" of this strange land merely invigorators and appetizers for the next meal.

To the confidence of youth is added the wisdom of experience, which, together with native shrewdness has landed them upon a wave of prosperity which will quickly place them in a position, though only yet on the threshold of life, to pursue their own ambitions no matter to what heights they may soar.

Source: The Klondike Nugget, November 1, 1899.

   
YOUNG, ANDY
  The Nugget's special number would not be complete without a sketch of its popular, hustling salesman, "Uncle" Andy Young.  Uncle Andy has been selling The Nugget on the streets of Dawson for more than a year, and in that time has made his call "the dear little Nugget," so well-known that it has passed into common use, and become celebrated from Skagway to St. Michaels.  Andy is a Californian, "with all the Californian's hustling qualities.  He has a peculiar genius for selling papers and is never so happy as when on the street serving his customers with The Nugget.

At the expiration of his first year's work, Andy finds that he has averaged a little more than 450 copies per issue for 105 numbers, making a total number of papers sold during this period of 47,250.  His commissions during this time, at 10 cents per paper, have therefore aggregated the snug sum of $4,725, a considerable portion of which has been sent to his family in West Berkley, California.

Uncle Andy is one of Dawson's interesting characters, without mention of whom no history of the town would be complete.

Source: The Klondike Nugget, November 1, 1899.

 



 


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